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About Worksheet Levels

All of the worksheets in the Super Simple Learning Resource Center are categorized into five levels. The levels are based on the required motor skills (such as coloring, writing, and scissor skills), the concepts covered on the worksheet, and the difficulty level. We’ve given a suggested age range for each level, but keep in mind that these are only guidelines. Each child and each teaching situation is different. Whether you are teaching your child at home, in a classroom in the USA, or working with students in an English as a second or foreign language environment, you are the one best qualified to judge what level and type of worksheet will be best for your children or students.

Additionally, worksheets are identified by topic, and related Super Simple Learning product. To practice cutting skills or writing, look for the scissors and pencil icons. All worksheets are available in full color or a black and white version. Each worksheet comes with instructions and suggested uses, but feel free to get creative and use them in different ways.

 
    Coloring Pages
  • Requires minimal motor skills such as the ability to hold a crayon and color at a very basic level.
  • The ability to identify colors is helpful.
  • Best for ages 2 and up.

  • Requires basic motor skills, the ability to hold a crayon, color more detailed images, and draw lines.
  • Many activities involve recognizing vocabulary images and matching.
  • Best for ages 3 and up, but can be used with younger children with assistance from an adult.
 
  • Requires motor skills such as the ability to hold a pencil and use scissors to cut simple lines and shapes.
  • Many activities involve recognizing vocabulary images and sometimes letters and words. Word keys are always provided.
  • May involve recognizing and writing numbers up to 10.
  • Best for ages 4 and up, but can be used with younger children with assistance from an adult.
 
  • Requires motor skills such as the ability to hold a pencil and use scissors to cut more complicated lines and shapes.
  • May involve beginning writing ability, sometimes tracing. When it is required to write words, a key is usually provided.
  • May involve recognizing and writing numbers larger than 10.
  • Best for ages 5 and up, but can be used with younger children with assistance from an adult.
 
  • Requires basic reading skills and the ability to print both upper and lowercase letters.
  • When required to write words, a key is usually not provided with the exception of more complicated worksheets.
  • Some worksheets cover more difficult topics such as telling time.
  • Usually ages 6 and up, but can be used with younger children with assistance from an adult.